The Winter 2015 Lectures

FREE public one-hour lectures followed by a question period

TORONTO:Sundays at 2 pm (doors open at 1:15) Macleod Auditorium, Medical Sciences Building, University of Toronto 1 King’s College Circle (Nearest Subway is Queen’s Park Station) Parking on campus, pay/display; limited disabled parking available. MISSISSAUGA:Thursday evenings at 7:30 p.m. at Noel Ryan Auditorium, Ground Floor, Mississauga Central Library, 301 Burnhamthorpe Road W. Parking under the library is free after 6 p.m. Enter via the ramp accessed from the southbound lane on Duke of York Boulevard between City Centre Drive and Burnhamthorpe Road.
We thank the University of Toronto and the Mississauga Central Library for their support.

 

Jan
11
Sun
2015
Genomes: What Happens When the Recipes Go Wrong? @ Toronto
Jan 11 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Frey_Brenda-150x150Brendan Frey, PhD, Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research,
Professor of Engineering and Medicine, University of Toronto

Viewing the genome as a collection of recipes rather than a catalogue of genes is fundamentally changing how we think about and treat genetic diseases such as cancers, spinal muscular atrophy and autism. The implications for you personally and for the sustainability of health care are shocking.

Webcast here

 

 

For more information on Dr. Frey’s talk:

Dr. Frey’s lab’s website

 

 

Jan
18
Sun
2015
Genetics and the Future of Medicine: Promises Realized, Promises Vain @ Toronto
Jan 18 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Roderick R. McInnes, CM, OOnt, MD, PhD, FRSC, Director, Alva Chair in Human Genetics, Director, Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University

Exciting new genetics research is in the news almost daily. Companies promise (for a fee) to analyze your genome (but beware!). Despite the hype, the real discoveries are truly extraordinary and are transforming our understanding of normal biology, and how we manage and treat disease.

Co-sponsored by the Gairdner Foundation

WEBCAST

Jan
25
Sun
2015
The Calculating Brain: Development, Enculturation and Individual Differences @ Toronto
Jan 25 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Daniel Ansari. PhD, Department of Psychology, Brain and Mind Institute, Western University, London

What happens in our brains that allows us to calculate and become mathematically fluent? As the brain develops, the structures and functions associated with calculation change dynamically. In this talk of interest to educators, parents and anyone who has ever felt “mathematically challenged”, we will explore how individual differences in competence and strategy-use affect the brain as we calculate.

WEBCAST

Numerical Cognition Laboratory at Western University

Feb
1
Sun
2015
Across International Boundaries: Tracking Birds and Butterflies @ Toronto
Feb 1 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Ryan Norris, MSc, PhD,Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph

Each year, billions of migratory organisms on our planet commute vast distances between their temperate breeding grounds and tropical overwintering habitats. I will share with you how we’ve uncovered some of these incredible, record-breaking migrations and, using an example of the iconic monarch butterfly, show why tracking individuals over the course of the annual cycle is fundamental for their successful conservation.

Feb
6
Fri
2015
Birds, Bytes and Breakthrough Technology @ Mississauga
Feb 6 @ 12:30 am – 2:00 am

Steven Price, MS, BSc, President, Bird Studies Canada

In the field, people can now record plant and animal sightings in real time with their smart phones. At the same time, emerging radio tracking technology known as “motus” (from the Latin for “motion”) is transforming bird migration research. Together, these open the door to new “citizen science” and exciting discoveries in both the academic and recreational realms, key to conserving birds and all wildlife.

WEBCAST HERE

Bird Studies Canada

Feb
8
Sun
2015
Lost Explorers: The Archaeology of John Franklin’s Last Expedition @ Toronto
Feb 8 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Robert W. Park, PhD, Department of Anthropology; Associate Dean of Arts, University of Waterloo

Sir John Franklin’s third expedition, the most infamous European voyage to navigate a sea route through the Canadian Arctic, has captivated people in Canada and around the world for a century and a half. Explore recent archaeological research and what it tells us about the lives and deaths of these explorers has revealed about the lives and deaths these explorers. Join the voyage as we revisit the momentous finds that led to the discovery of Franklin’s long-lost ship Erebus.

WEBCAST HERE

Feb
15
Sun
2015
Keeping Time: Morning Larks, Night Owls and Circadian Rhythms @ Toronto
Feb 15 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Andrew Lim, MD, FRCPC, Associate Professor and Clinician Scientist, Division of Neurology,
Department of Medicine, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto

Circadian rhythms are 24-hour biological rhythms that affect our health and behaviour, influencing many things, from the best time to take a test, to the timing of a heart attack or stroke, to the arrival of death itself. Recent discoveries about the mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms have implications on how we organize school, work, social, and medical schedules.

WEBCAST HERE

Ontario Sleep Health Study

Feb
22
Sun
2015
Roving the Red Planet: Exploring from Afar @ Toronto
Feb 22 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Ralf Gellert, PhD, Department of Physics, University of Guelph

Thanks to NASA’s Mars Rovers, we know much more about our planetary neighbour than we did a decade ago. Controlled from Earth, experiments conducted by the Rover instruments reveal that Mars was once a more habitable place. A key instrument on all 4 Mars Rovers and also on the Rosetta mission lander, Philae, is the Canadian APXS experiment, a soda-can sized device that measures the composition of rocks and soils.

Co-Sponsored by the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada – Toronto Centre.

 

WEBCAST

Mars Exploration Rovers APXS site
Mars Science Laboratory APSX Site
Rosetta mission APXS site

Mar
1
Sun
2015
Let’s Talk Science @ Toronto
Mar 1 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

An afternoon of engaging hands-on activities geared towards children 6-12 years and their families, sharing the excitement of science, technology, engineering and math.

Volunteers running the activities will include post-secondary students who are eager to share their passion for science and can help answer your questions.

Doors open at 1:30 pm

Event ends at 3:30 pm

Mar
6
Fri
2015
Architecture, Design and the Brain: The Neuroscience of Space Appreciation @ Mississauga
Mar 6 @ 12:30 am – 2:00 am

Vartanian_Oshin-150x150
Oshin Vartanian, PhD
, Defence Scientist, Defence Research and Development Canada

On average, we urban dwellers spend about 90% of our time indoors, and share the strong intuition that the physical features of the places we live and work in influence how we feel and act. Explore how the brain responds to variations in the physical features of our environments, and the effect this has on our appreciation for various types of spaces and our decisions to enter or exit it.

WEBCAST

Apr
2
Thu
2015
Towards Transportation Sustainability: The Need for a Third Urban Revolution @ Mississauga
Apr 2 @ 7:30 pm – 8:45 pm

Miller_Eric-150x150Eric Miller, PhD, Department of Civil Engineering, Director, University of Toronto Transportation Research Institute

This presentation briefly sketches the evolution of urban form and transportation and then explores issues and options for evolving 21st Century cities into more sustainable, attractive “homes” for people and firms.

 

WEBCAST